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Rejecting Tax Breakdowns from Non-Migrated Carriers

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Created by Shankar S on 2010-08-21 15:28:01 Back to Topics

Rejecting Tax Breakdowns from Non-Migrated Carriers

Hi
 
Below query is still open in Emirates internal working group discussion list, even though SIS had tried to clarify it  :
 
Query : When a Migrated carrier receives Prime billing from Non-Migrated carrier, the billing comes in IDEC format. Tax break up is not provided by the billing carrier. When this Prime billing is rejected, the Migrated carrier provides tax break up of accepted tax only, can the Migrated carrier put entire billed tax against one tax code and show the difference.
 
Reply from SIS - The rule will be that you need to put the tax under the individual appropriate tax codes.
 
Query from Emirates working group - The non migrated carrier billings will be received by the migrated carrier through the OLD IDEC file & in the old IDEC file there is no provision to be provide billed tax breakup. Since the migrated carrier will not receive the billed tax breakup, how will they provide the breakup during rejection stage.
Example : One one coupon, Non migrated carrier bills USD50 as tax without giving break up. Migrated carrier finds that it can accept USD10 against tax A, USD20 against tax B and USD15 against tax C. Balance USD5 need to be rejected. Against which tax code USD5 will be rejected. While rejecting, the migrated carrier need to provide rejected tax code in IS IDEC file. It does not know, the tax break up of USD100 as in IDEC, there is no provision for non migrated carrier to provide tax break up .
Replied by James S on 2010-08-27 10:01:19
Hi.
 
Sorry for the initial confusion. You would basically assign the difference to one of the taxes that you allow, and it doesn't matter which one.
 
So, given your example, there are 3 ways to create the rejection:
 
Option 1
Tax
Billed
Accepted
Difference
A
$15
$10
$5
B
$20
$20
$0
C
$15
$15
$0
Total

$50

$45

$5


 
Option 2
Tax
Billed
Accepted
Difference
A
$10
$10
$0
B
$25
$20
$5
C
$15
$15
$0
Total

$50

$45

$5

 
Option 3
Tax
Billed
Accepted
Difference
A
$10
$10
$0
B
$20
$20
$0
C
$20
$15
$5
Total

$50

$45

$5

 
 
Note that in all cases, the total shows the situation -- $50 billed, $45 accepted, $5 difference.
 
James
Replied by Shankar S on 2010-08-30 13:17:25
Thank you very much Sir. It is very clear now.
 
Since our IT is writing technical design, they have one more query, if a non migrated carrier bills a tax under IDEC and billed migrated carrier finds no tax applicable, under which tax code billed carrier should reject. Can it take any tax code not pertaining to that sector and reject the billed tax under that code. Pls confirm.
 
Thanks and Rgds


From: IATA
Posted: Friday, August 27, 2010 10:01 AM
Subject: Rejecting Tax Breakdowns from Non-Migrated Carriers

Hi.
 
Sorry for the initial confusion. You would basically assign the different to one of the taxes that you allow, and it doesn't matter which one.
 
So, given your example, there are 3 ways to create the rejection:
 
Option 1
Tax
Billed
Accepted
Difference
A
$15
$10
$5
B
$20
$20
$0
C
$15
$15
$0
Total

$50

$45

$5


 
Option 2
Tax
Billed
Accepted
Difference
A
$10
$10
$0
B
$25
$20
$5
C
$15
$15
$0
Total

$50

$45

$5

 
Option 3
Tax
Billed
Accepted
Difference
A
$10
$10
$0
B
$20
$20
$0
C
$20
$15
$5
Total

$50

$45

$5

 
 
Note that in all cases, the total shows the situation -- $50 billed, $45 accepted, $5 difference.
 
James
Replied by James S on 2010-09-01 10:04:24
If you know, or can guess, the tax that they were intending to charge for, you would provide that, but show Accepted = $0.
 
If you can't guess, you would have to provide it as an abitrary, "random" tax code. (Of course, it'd have to be a valid tax code to pass validation.)
 
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